Seattle Lindy Exchange Westlake Mall August 7th 2005


Comments? Questions? Send email to Scott Larson.
Click to see 1.jpg
1.jpg Welcome to my annual experiment with B&W film and antiquated cameras. I replaced the Canon AE-1 that blew up last year with a slightly more modern Canon A-1 so I could still use my old FD lens (24mm, 85mm and 200mm). Unfortunately the camera came with a curse. I'll get to that.
Click to see 2.jpg
2.jpg I'm starting off with Ilford Delta 100. I've already said in the past that it's too contrasty and has ridiculous amounts of grain. Why did I use it? Well, Ilford has been having hard times lately and I felt sorry for them!
Click to see 3.jpg
3.jpg
Click to see 4.jpg
4.jpg On most of these shots, I'm shooting through a YA2 (orange filter). It's great for getting these contrasty skies. Unfortunately it adds way more contrast than a Y2 (yellow) filter which sure didn't help Delta 100 one bit.
Click to see 5.jpg
5.jpg
Click to see 6.jpg
6.jpg For three quarter portraits, the 85mm was the best.
Click to see 7.jpg
7.jpg
Click to see 8.jpg
8.jpg
Click to see 9.jpg
9.jpg
Click to see 10.jpg
10.jpg
Click to see 11.jpg
11.jpg
Click to see 12.jpg
12.jpg
Click to see 13.jpg
13.jpg
Click to see 14.jpg
14.jpg As soon as I looked through my 200mm lens, I thought "Why the hell am I using a 200mm lens? It belongs on a satellite!" I had used it at the Portland Exchange but then Pioneer Square is about four times the size of Westlake Mall and has things to stand on. I shot these 200mm shots literally from the other side of the mall.
Click to see 15.jpg
15.jpg
Click to see 16.jpg
16.jpg
Click to see 17.jpg
17.jpg Now I'm shooting Fuji Acros 100 which Fuji just introduced a couple of years ago (a new B&W film?). I was really pumped about this film at the Denver Exchange. It has fine grain, excellent lattitude and is really cheap. No wonder Ilford is in trouble.
Click to see 18.jpg
18.jpg
Click to see 19.jpg
19.jpg
Click to see 20.jpg
20.jpg 200mm works really well for candid half shots if you can keep people out of your way. No one will even know you're there.
Click to see 21.jpg
21.jpg
Click to see 22.jpg
22.jpg
Click to see 23.jpg
23.jpg Oh I see I had used my 200mm a couple of years ago and got mostly close ups. That works too.
Click to see 24.jpg
24.jpg
Click to see 25.jpg
25.jpg
Click to see 26.jpg
26.jpg
Click to see 27.jpg
27.jpg How to test a film's lattitude? Take some shots of blondes in bright sunlight.
Click to see 28.jpg
28.jpg Notice how the detail in Trudi's hair isn't totally blown out? Good film.
Click to see 29.jpg
29.jpg
Click to see 30.jpg
30.jpg
Click to see 31.jpg
31.jpg
Click to see 32.jpg
32.jpg
Click to see 33.jpg
33.jpg
Click to see 34.jpg
34.jpg
Click to see 35.jpg
35.jpg
Click to see 36.jpg
36.jpg Notice how Emily is being lit from sunlight reflected off of a building's windows? Must remember that for next year!
Click to see 37.jpg
37.jpg Remember that curse I mentioned? Here it is -- the viewfinder was misaligned. That made me cut the tops of some people's heads off. Fortunately I cut off mostly guys' heads so no big deal. If you buy a 30 year old camera, you really should test this. At least it didn't have any light leaks.
Click to see 38.jpg
38.jpg
Click to see 39.jpg
39.jpg OK now were shooting with Kodak 125PX. The PX is short for Plus-X which means nothing to me. It's about average in grain and lattitude. Go for the Fuji Acros instead.
Click to see 40.jpg
40.jpg When I got home, my cat decided this roll would be his new toy. Good thing I found it in a closet a week later, cuz there are some fun ones here.
Click to see 41.jpg
41.jpg
Click to see 42.jpg
42.jpg
Click to see 43.jpg
43.jpg
Click to see 44.jpg
44.jpg
Click to see 45.jpg
45.jpg
Click to see 46.jpg
46.jpg
Click to see 47.jpg
47.jpg
Click to see 48.jpg
48.jpg
Click to see 49.jpg
49.jpg
Click to see 50.jpg
50.jpg
Click to see 51.jpg
51.jpg Another good side-lit shot. Must remember that for next year.
Click to see 52.jpg
52.jpg
Click to see 53.jpg
53.jpg
Click to see 54.jpg
54.jpg
Click to see 55.jpg
55.jpg
Click to see 56.jpg
56.jpg
Click to see 57.jpg
57.jpg
Click to see 58.jpg
58.jpg
Click to see 59.jpg
59.jpg
Click to see 60.jpg
60.jpg
Click to see 61.jpg
61.jpg
Click to see 62.jpg
62.jpg
Click to see 63.jpg
63.jpg As the shim-sham commences, I've switched to Kodak BW400CN. This is Kodak's version of the wildly successful chromogenic B&W film that Ilford started with the XP series. This is actually color film formulated to print B&W so it's cheap to develop. And like Ilford's XP-2, it totally rocks!
Click to see 64.jpg
64.jpg Here I've purposely aimed the camera so one side will blow out. Yeah, purposely. Anyway, notice how detail is more or less recoverable in both sides? That's lattitude, people. Most regular B&W film would have fucked this up.
Click to see 65.jpg
65.jpg
Click to see 66.jpg
66.jpg Here I've cropped an underexposed shot by 50%. Where's the grain? Nowhere to be found. Awesome!
Click to see 67.jpg
67.jpg
Click to see 68.jpg
68.jpg
Click to see 69.jpg
69.jpg
Click to see 70.jpg
70.jpg
Click to see 71.jpg
71.jpg
Click to see 72.jpg
72.jpg
Click to see 73.jpg
73.jpg
Click to see 74.jpg
74.jpg
Click to see 75.jpg
75.jpg
Click to see 76.jpg
76.jpg
Click to see 77.jpg
77.jpg
Click to see 78.jpg
78.jpg
Click to see 79.jpg
79.jpg
Click to see 80.jpg
80.jpg
Click to see 81.jpg
81.jpg
Click to see 82.jpg
82.jpg
Click to see 83.jpg
83.jpg
Click to see 84.jpg
84.jpg
Click to see 85.jpg
85.jpg
Click to see 86.jpg
86.jpg
Click to see 87.jpg
87.jpg For the final roll, let's finish the event with the worst B&W film that's not made by Agfa: Ilford HP5. To be fair, it's designed to look like old old old film but if you aren't expecting that, you would probably start sobbing once you got your shots developed.
Click to see 88.jpg
88.jpg Now I've cleaned up most of these shots because I don't think our follows want to look like they're growing beards. I'll point out the ones I didn't clean up.
Click to see 89.jpg
89.jpg
Click to see 90.jpg
90.jpg Then in some very bright situations, HP5 works almost as well as most other films.
Click to see 91.jpg
91.jpg
Click to see 92.jpg
92.jpg The absence of detail is a side-effect of the scrubbing bubbles I needed to clean up shots like these.
Click to see 93.jpg
93.jpg Lattitude? Forget it pal.
Click to see 94.jpg
94.jpg
Click to see 95.jpg
95.jpg
Click to see 96.jpg
96.jpg
Click to see 97.jpg
97.jpg
Click to see 98.jpg
98.jpg
Click to see 99.jpg
99.jpg
Click to see 100.jpg
100.jpg
Click to see 101.jpg
101.jpg Here's some totally uncleaned (and colorized) HP5. If you want grainy artistic expressions instead of pictures, you could use HP5. Or you could save some money and buy the crappiest Agfa B&W film available. Whoops, looks like Agfa is doing even worse than Ilford these days.
Click to see 102.jpg
102.jpg
Click to see 103.jpg
103.jpg Grain, thy name is HP5.
Click to see 104.jpg
104.jpg
Click to see 105.jpg
105.jpg If you find yourself shooting in high-contrast situations with film that can't deal with it, you can try blowing out the background and colorizing the much darker foreground like this. It makes a nice separation between the fore and background.
Click to see 106.jpg
106.jpg
Click to see 107.jpg
107.jpg For some reason I don't feel like filling my refrigerator with boxes of HP5.
Click to see 108.jpg
108.jpg